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A Bluetooth exploit – BlueBorne, hackers can enter your phone in 10 seconds

Your phone, computer, smartwatch, and smart home devices are at risk of being hacked whenever Bluetooth is on.

The vulnerability, known as BlueBorne, was discovered by security research firm Armis.

Armis Labs revealed a new attack vector endangering major mobile, desktop, and IoT operating systems, including Android, iOS, Windows, and Linux, and the devices using them. The new vector is dubbed “BlueBorne”, as it spread through the air (airborne) and attacks devices via Bluetooth. Armis has also disclosed eight related zero-day vulnerabilities, four of which are classified as critical. BlueBorne allows attackers to take control of devices, access corporate data and networks, penetrate secure “air-gapped” networks, and spread malware laterally to adjacent devices. Armis reported these vulnerabilities to the responsible actors, and is working with them as patches are being identified and released.

What Devices Are Affected?

Android

All Android phones, tablets, and wearables (except those using only Bluetooth Low Energy) of all versions are affected by four vulnerabilities found in the Android operating system, two of which allow remote code execution (CVE-2017-0781 and CVE-2017-0782), one results in information leak (CVE-2017-0785) and the last allows an attacker to perform a Man-in-The-Middle attack (CVE-2017-0783).
Examples of impacted devices:

  • Google Pixel
  • Samsung Galaxy
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab
  • LG Watch Sport
  • Pumpkin Car Audio System

Google has issued a security update patch and notified its partners. It was available to Android partners on August 7th, 2017, and made available as part of the September Security Update and Bulletin on September 4, 2017. We recommend that users check that Bulletin for the latest most accurate information. Android users should verify that they have the September 9, 2017 Security Patch Level,

Note to Android users: To check if your device is at risk or is the devices around you are at risk, download the Armis BlueBorne Scanner App on Google Play.

Windows

All Windows computers since Windows Vista are affected by the “Bluetooth Pineapple” vulnerability which allows an attacker to perform a Man-in-The-Middle attack (CVE-2017-8628).

Microsoft issued has security patches to all supported Windows versions on July 11, 2017, with coordinated notification on Tuesday, September 12. We recommend that Windows users should check with the Microsoft release at here for the latest information.

Linux

Linux is the underlying operating system for a wide range of devices. The most commercial, and consumer-oriented platform based on Linux is the Tizen OS.

All Linux devices running BlueZ are affected by the information leak vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000250).
All Linux devices from version 3.3-rc1 (released in October 2011) are affected by the remote code execution vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251)
Examples of impacted devices:

  • Samsung Gear S3 (Smartwatch)
  • Samsung Smart TVs
  • Samsung Family Hub (Smart refrigerator)

Patches to Linux vulnerabilities have been pushed to the upstream projects. The information leak vulnerability was patched here, and the remote code execution was patched here Linux distributions have started to push updates as well, please look for specific updates made by your distribution.

iOS

All iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices with iOS 9.3.5 and lower, and AppleTV devices with version 7.2.2 and lower are affected by the remote code execution vulnerability (CVE-2017-14315). This vulnerability was already mitigated by Apple in iOS 10, so no new patch is needed to mitigate it. We recommend you upgrade to the latest iOS or tvOS available.

If you are concerned that your device may not be patched, we recommend disabling Bluetooth, and minimizing its use until you can confirm a patch is issued and installed on your device.

Final note on how to secure against BlueBorne

Vulnerabilities that can spread over the air and between devices pose a tremendous threat to any organization or individual. Current security measures, including endpoint protection, mobile data management, firewalls, and network security solution are not designed to identify these type of attacks, and related vulnerabilities and exploits, as their main focus is to block attacks that can spread via IP connections.

New solutions are needed to address the new airborne attack vector, especially those that make air gapping irrelevant. Additionally, there will need to be more attention and research as new protocols are using for consumers and businesses alike. With the large number of desktop, mobile, and IoT devices only increasing, it is critical we can ensure these types of vulnerabilities are not exploited. This is the primary mission of Armis in this new connected age.

For more information https://www.armis.com/blueborne/

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